19
Apr
2015
Underground Indian Cuisine in Irving - photo by Itty Bitty Foodies

Underground Indian Cuisine in Irving

Beefcake and I love Indian food especially when we lived in Singapore. We’d go to hawker stalls and gorge on roti and hot curries served on a banana leaf instead of plates. But since moving to Dallas, we’d not ventured too much into the cuisine especially after having the kids. But slowly we’ve found some authentic places clustered around the Irving/Las Colinas areas. Underground Indian Cuisine is one of them. They serve Pershawri Indian cuisine from the Northern region which tends to be less spicy. It’s a great way to introduce the children to Indian cuisine.

The subterranean interior of Underground Indian Cuisine (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

The subterranean interior of Underground Indian Cuisine (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

{Thank you to Underground Indian Cuisine for providing this complimentary meal. All opinions & thoughts are our own}

 

In general, Northern Indian cuisine use more dairy (like cottage cheese), yogurt, food infused with pomegranate and wheat-based breads. Southern Indian which has soupier curries, tends to use tamarind and rice. The Northern Indian cuisine is also influenced by the Muglais. The less spicy, royal cuisine is refined, and uses fresh herbs and spices for flavoring. A specialty of the house is “dum pukht” slow oven cooking.

Buffet (photo courtesy of Underground Indian Cuisine)

Buffet (photo courtesy of Underground Indian Cuisine)

Dum puhkt cooking uses a round, heavy- bottomed pot, a handi, in which food is tightly sealed and cooked over a slow fire. There are two main aspects to this style of cooking; bhunao and dum, or ‘roasting’ and ‘maturing’ of a prepared dish. In this style of cuisine, herbs and spices play an extremely critical role. The process of slow roasting gently persuades each to release maximum flavor. The sealing of the lid of the handi with dough achieves maturing. Cooking slowly in its juices, the food retains all its natural aromas and becomes imbued with the richness of flavors that distinguishes the dish.

Vegetarian samosas (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Vegetarian samosas (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

We started with a vegetarian samosa, mildly spiced fried potato and pea fritter. The kids were able to eat this but not the spicy accompanying mint raita and tamarind chutney dipping sauces.

Yogurt marinated grilled chicken (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Yogurt marinated grilled chicken (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

The yogurt marinated chicken kebabs were a favorite. Roasted perfectly, the pieces of chicken were succulent and brightened up by the topping of fresh herbs.

Garlic naan was so good we had to order two (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Garlic naan was so good we had to order two (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Next came naan, a soft oven-baked flatbread brushed with ghee (clarified butter) and garlic that the kids could not get enough of. We tore up pieces and dipped them into our Palak Paneer, creamy spinach with cubes of cottage cheese. The bread was elastic and thick enough to hold the dum pukht curries.

Dum Pukht curries are a specialty of the house at Underground Indian Cuisine (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Dum Pukht curries are a specialty of the house at Underground Indian Cuisine (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

The Oudhi Qurma, a dish favored by the royal Nawabs of Oudh were tender cubes of lamb in a smooth, rich, cashew cream gravy. The favorite of the night was another royal dish, prawns done in a Bengali style was a multi-layer of creamy flavors and spices.

Mango lassi cools down the spicy palates (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Mango lassi cools down the spicy palates (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

To offset the spiciness, the kids enjoyed a yogurt mango lassi.

Lunch buffet is a better option for dining with kids (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Lunch buffet is a better option for dining with kids (photo by www.ittybittyfoodies.com)

Underground Indian Cuisine has a daily lunch buffet which features the more familiar dishes like Tandoori chicken and an array of curries and colorful Biryani rice. I would recommend going this route with kids and ordering a la carte dishes as dinner service, like dum pukht cooking was slow.

Till our next Happy Meal.

Click here for more info on Underground Indian Cuisine. Also note that there’s a second location in Downtown Dallas.

ITTY BITTY INFO:

  • Food: Milder Northern Indian cuisine
  • Ambiance: quiet but laid back
  • Service: Friendly but extremely slow
  • Kid Friendliness: 🙂 🙂 🙂
  • Itty Bitty Foodies Tip: Go during lunch buffet when you do not have to wait for items
  • Parent Foodies Tip: Dum pukht curries are the specialties. Well worth the visit.

Underground Indian Cuisine on Urbanspoon

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